Q4U: What Gives You Hope?

It’s no secret that things are changing so fast in the publishing industry – along with the entire culture – that it’s difficult to know where we’ll be in a year, let alone five or ten years from now. Some people are pessimistic about the future of publishing, but I don’t listen much to the doomsday predictors, the “publishing is dying” crowd, because I see plenty of indicators that the written word will be around for a long time to come. I remain optimistic and hopeful.

What about you? What are some things happening today that give you hope about the publishing world of tomorrow?

Have a great weekend!

© 2010 Rachelle Gardner, Literary Agent

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  • Fanciful Musings

    >I am actually really excited about the future of publishing. E-books are convenient, but there is nothing that can replace that feeling of curling up with a real book on a cold, rainy day and just letting the words transport you into the writer's world.

    I definitely think that huge changes will (and are) happening but I can't ever see a time where real books will be replaced completely. There are too many people out there that love the feel of opening a exciting new book, and staring at the words printed on a screen does not compare.

    The other thing that leaves me optimistic about the future of the publishing world (and something I just talked to my friend about the other night) is that so many agents, editors and publishers writing blogs, commenting on Twitter and facebook and even just having their websites available to us. It gives the new writers a chance to really get to know what you are looking for. As well as having the advantage of all the tips, tricks and advice that can only help us during the exciting (and terrifying) process of submitting our manuscripts.

    And, wow, I really rambled but I can't help it. I'm excited to try and be a part of this world.

  • Sam

    >Little-engine-that-could type stories like "Machine of Death"– some of my fave webcomic people put together a short story anthology. Nobody would publish it because it had no big name authors in it. They self-published, and whipped up a big campaign (spending no money, just talking it up on their own websites) to get their readers to all buy the book on the same day and make it an Amazon best-seller for a day– which worked! And now they are raking in requests from major chain stores like Barnes and Noble to start stocking it in brick-and-mortar stores.

    What makes it even more awesome is that the guys were pretty honest about the fact that they will also be providing the book for FREE online as a pdf, and they still have such a strong fan base that people are spending money on the book to support them.

    Also, the book is quite funny. ;D

  • Anonymous

    >I prefer the feel of real books but I'm optimistic that e-books can pave the way for those who aren't yet "ready for prime time."
    With more options available to e-publish and even self-publish, there may be less competition for those of us who want to be published the "old-fashioned" way.

    Let the Gen X Y Zers interact with their urban fantasy and paranormal worlds on e-readers while those of use who prefer the real world can stick to hardbacks and trade paperback books. Let's hope there's room for everyone with a good story to tell, in whatever form.
    ps/Case in point: Sam's post above.

  • Ellen Brickley

    >I see a lot of evidence that people love stories and the written word. Either presentation will be a selling point (see the resurgence of the popularity of music on vinyl since the dawn of the mp3 era), or else it will cease to matter.

    People still love stories. We're good!

  • Rosemary Gemmell

    >Thanks for being positive, Rachelle – I can't stand the doom and gloom coming from some people.

    While nothing will take the place of a 'real' book, the rise of e-publishers offers an additional method of getting words to readers, which is surely the point.

    And it offers more hope to authors unable to make it with the big mainstream publishers. Good to know there's a place for every kind of publishing.

  • Lucky Press, LLC

    >I am optimistic about publishing. Authors and small publishers have more was than ever to connect with readers — I could not have imagined when I was a teenager interacting via Facebook or email with an author whose work I loved, or discovering new books and authors through a site like Amazon. Now we almost take that ability for granted.

    We can peruse sample book pages and access all the additional content available (book trailers, author blogs, etc.). And everything happens so quickly, compared to in the past.

    I think it is a wonderful time to be a writer (and a small publisher), and while there are certainly challenges there have always been a lot of challenges. I think in the end we, the writing and reading community, are better off today than 25 or 50 or 75 years ago.

    The conversations among authors and readers, and agents and authors, and readers and readers gives me hope for the future. And the technology doesn't frighten me, it entices me to think, "What if?"

  • steeleweed

    >The media is changing, but that's been happening since Gutenberg. The publisher/agent model will survive but at a smaller level as the market for paper shrinks with the next generation growing up digital.

    I do think the 'gatekeeper' function of agent/publisher is eroding with the growth of self-publishing via POD. That function will move to 'Net-based reviewing which I expect to see increase dramatically. There will be sites/bloggers specific to genre as well as general reviewers. Readers will follow according their tastes.

  • Sue Harrison

    >Children reading! The new library in our little town! The ladies in my reading group! My mom and I reading "The Secret Garden" together, again, fifty years after the first time!

  • Gwen Stewart

    >The enduring nature of the arts gives me great hope.

    Even Jesus used stories to tell great Truths. Until the very end, stories will continue to be a powerful way of sharing truth, igniting imagination, and providing entertainment, in my humble opinion.

  • Jennie Dugan

    >I had a nurse practitioner tell me recently that she has a photographic memory, but she's found that it doesn't work with electronic copy. She has to print it out and read it, if she wants to retain it. She may be unique, but I wonder if that's a hint about how the mind works and why some of us just plain prefer hard copies.
    I like the idea of passing a book along, too. When I love it, I want to share it.

  • Wendy Paine Miller

    >Hope stays alive because I’ve watched amazing things happen with author friends. I see publishing houses taking chances with debut authors and boldly taking on interesting projects. I read the blogs of dynamic leaders in the industry (like Michael Hyatt’s) and agents who are willing to work hard as advocates for authors and I’m encouraged.

    The climate is changing but many in the industry are making preparations to adapt to the changes.

    And I second Gwen’s humble opinion, stories will remain.

    I was at a football game last night and I struck up a conversation with a librarian seated behind me. We both love holding a book in our hands. Quote me in ten years but I just can’t see the love of having a book to hold going away.

    I also hope because that’s part of who I am.

    ~ Wendy

  • Anonymous

    >Publishing isn't dying. Publishing is changing the same way the music industry changed a decade ago. The biggest changes the music industry experienced are: move from selling albums to single songs (huge revenue hit), and a switch to different distribution channels — iTunes, Amazon, Pandora, etc. I'm leaving out piracy since it's extremely difficult to quantify the impact. I think the actual revenue hit really came from customers buying only one or two tracks from a CD, rather than buying the whole thing.

    The publishing industry is under pressure to change, but they seem to be making bad decisions. Moving to the agency model with amazon will go down as a huge mistake. The pricing doesn't work. And if I were a client of yours, my preference would be to sell to a publisher that doesn't use the agency model with amazon.

    The problem with that model became evident to me last week. My girlfriend went to buy the book "Wolfsbane and Mistletoe" for her Kindle since she loves Harris's books. I also saw the book listed up on Janet Reid's blog, so I wanted to support one of her clients since the advice I get from Query Shark is invaluable. However, the Kindle version cost about double what the paperback version sold for. So she bought the book in paperback. I'll read it when she finishes.

    And as a buyer with a smart phones, my girlfriend and I can walk through a used book store with amazon up on our phones and compare prices on the fly. I'm sure we're a small part of the population doing this, but it happens. I also get better customer service at my local used bookstore than my chain bookstores.

    The big challenge as a writer is finding the right agent and publisher who will adapt to the changing economic environment without leaving the writer feel let down or abused. For example, the whole idea of a returns clause associated with electronic books is absurd. And why should writers have to be penalized for publishers inability to manage their supply chain? I hear lots of stories from writers getting burnt on returns. And finally, why should writers only earn 25% on electronic books? It's not like the publisher has any more sunked costs after formatting the book for the first time.

    Right now, publishers need to do what banks have done: move to a low cost delivery method.

    And I hope agents can help writers find publishers to handle their books properly. If this means finding one publisher to do the print version and another to do the electronic version, then so be it.

    Sorry if this sounded like a rant.

  • A. Grey

    >I have hope because I keep finding great new books on the shelves.

    Because I keep meeting other writers, and keep getting excited over their writing.

    Because I keep meeting awesome people already established within the industry (writers, editors etc) who get excited ABOUT ME and tell me that we *new generation* ARE the future of the industry… and then they proceed to talk to me, and help me, and do what they can to support the industry that they love so much.

    Because humans NEED stories, in whatever form.

  • Jessie Andersen

    >Answered prayers give me hope. Every time I'm feeling discouraged, I ask God for encouragement. Every single time within one week, I've been asked for another partial by an agent. It's good to know God wants to answer the little prayers that sometimes seem insignificant too.

  • Cheryl Barker

    >What gives me hope for the future of publishing? My 8-yr. old nephew BEGGING my sister to let him get the new Wimpy Kid book that released this week. And yes, I'll be getting that boy books for Christmas! :)

  • Timothy Fish

    >Facebook gives me hope. And blogs. And pretty much anything else on the Web. People are reading more than ever and they're looking for great stories and useful information. People are still turning to the written word for entertainment and information.

  • Angie

    >I think sitting in a bookstore with a cup of coffee and browsing through physical books, is becoming a retreat for most. With "gadgets" spanning the spectrum of what they can do, I constantly hear people say they need to use the off switch more than ever! I once heard from a college professor that specific technologies trend towards a climactic point, where they've reached capacity of their capabilities…The most hopeful thing to me is, books, stories, creativity, have no bounds…we will always find knowledge and new horizons in the written word.

  • Alexis Grant

    >But there are so many more fun tools to use in the future of publishing! I'm so excited about creating an online component to go with my book, maybe even an app! If I'd written this book 10 years ago, none of that would've been possible.

  • Heather Sunseri

    >I think the hope I'm finding is from deep within myself. I'm seeing friends get publishing contracts, I'm reading debut books from authors who were given their big chance by publishers and those authors are hitting homeruns, and I'm benefitting from the agents and other people in the business who blog in order to help writers find their way. But through all this, I'm finding hope from within myself. I've seen myself change during the years I've been writing. I'm growning closer to God in huge ways, I'm meeting others on a similar path, and through reading fiction, craft books, and attending conferences, I'm growing closer and closer to a near-impossible dream. All writers and anyone with a dream, really, can grow closer to their dream by drawing from God and letting hope come from within and not be squashed by the things we can't control on the outside.

    Yikes! I wasn't aiming for something so deep when I started the comment. Have a good weekend, Rachelle! Thank you for the inspiration and time you give writers on this path. You do a big part in giving writers hope.

  • Dorci

    >If the day ever came that the last physical book were published it would be a sad day indeed. What gives me hope is that I think a lot of writers feel the same way. We love the written word and I think a lot of us also love the feel of the paper they're printed on, the smell of a beloved old book, and even the excitment of walking into a library and looking around at the adventures to be had on every shelf.

    I like to think that a new writer is born every day, one who will carry on the wonder of story and a passion for communicating to fellow readers. And I like to think they carry in their hearts, too, a love for the written word and for the feel of a good ol' book.

  • Angie

    >Alexis- Totally AGREE!! We have amazing tools now to get word out about our word! Just love the timelessness of picking up a good book and turning the pages without a "click"! :)

  • Anonymous

    >To Jennie Dugan—RE: comment about not retaining what's read electronically, the book "The Shallows: What the Internet Is Doing To Your Brain" explains studies that have been done to show why that is the case.

    I'm not finished with the book yet, but thus far it has been very informative.

  • Noelle Pierce

    >A few people have already said these, but it's worth repeating: kids reading.

    People may bemoan the eReaders, but people bemoaned the rise of mp3s, too (especially that LP crowd…*grin*). Our kids are growing up digital and if we cater to those mediums, they're more likely to pick up a book. Plus, I see so many people in my library each time I visit, so even if they can't afford to buy, people are still reading.

    Oh, and the sheer number of debut authors I've read in the last year. While that number might decline because of the more cautious industry (I'm aware it takes about 18 months from contract to shelves), it's still being done. New authors are being picked up.

    Those things give me hope.

  • Sharon A. Lavy

    >Agents and other writers who are willing to help each other learn the writing craft.

    Also the fact that we will always have introverts. For some of us, our idea of a good time is curling up with a good book.

  • midnightblooms

    >The number one reason I have hope that the written word will never "die" . . .

    because people keep writing things down.

    We keep arguing about stuff. We keep exchanging ideas. Heck, we are, right this minute, typing and reading opinions about whether we will continue to write things down! (OOoh, how very meta of us.)

    The media we use to exchange written words has changed and continues to change and will continue to change (from scrolls to paper to email to blogs to text messages to e-readers, etc) as humans exchange ideas at an ever-increasing rate. That will never stop.

    Humans, even us hermit-like writer types, are social creatures who seek out connections with other humans. That's why we talk and that's why we write. (At least that's one reason why I write. It's the same for ya'll, right?)

    Now I believe that methods for publishing those written ideas will change. It already has. Publishing will not die, but it will change, dramatically and drastically. It will take a long time, and the established businesses will try to hold onto their traditions and history as long as possible, but like all industry, will eventually be pulled kicking and screaming into the next generation of technology, and some will fail and some will flash and burn and some will succeed.

    But the written word will go on.

  • Marilynn

    >Publishing won't die. We may not recognize it in ten years, but it will be there. Despite all the moaning and groaning, there are more outlets for fiction — because it's fiction we're talking about, isn't it? — than ever before. My husband has turned to self-publishing, and his Kindle edition is selling well. Many writers I know are going directly to small presses, which may be more welcoming to debut novels. Still others are getting agents and proceeding in the traditional way or querying agents with the hope of proceeding in the traditional way.

    The change and the turbulence that goes with it are frightening, and the internet provides people with a chance to publish an interesting and useful blog like this one or lies, half-truths, and predictions of doom that are just the latest version of the cartoon showing a bearded man in a white gown carrying a sandwich board saying"The end is nigh!"

  • Rosslyn Elliott

    >I'm going to second (or third) Wendy and Heather.

    I feel as if Christian publishing is moving to a new level, thanks to talented authors who started publishing in the last decade plus brand new authors in several genres who may open doors to a new demographic base. It's very encouraging to see leading publishers taking calculated risks on fresh voices. Their boldness will change the image of Christian fiction for the better. I also hope grass-roots efforts like the Inspy Awards will raise the profile of some of the excellent writers out there in the CBA. Wouldn't it be fantastic if Christians of all denominations began to see Christian fiction as a top choice for their leisure time, because it's just that good? Wouldn't it be great if we started to see more big-budget movies based on some of the quality novels that are hitting the market?

  • Kay Day

    >As long as people read, there is hope for writers. I'm not sure what all the anxiety is about.

  • nightwriter

    >Hi Rachelle: interesting posts.
    Q4U: What gives YOU hope re: the publishing industry? Are there more or less multiple-book deals? Do you see e-publishing as a postive trend? Does it help or hurt authors sell more books and earn more overall? Thanks in advance.

  • Susan Bourgeois

    >I think there's a great need for the publishing world to be around in the future.

    It doesn't take much to realize that our present world is moving too fast. Take a short time out to ponder the following:

    Children and adults are dependent on numerous electronical devices throughout the day more than any point throughout history.

    This cannot be good for numerous reasons.

    We need to revert to simple times in life and the sooner we figure it out the better. What better way than choosing to read great books?

    There's simply too much electronic stimulation in our lives. There was a recent segment on this exact issue on one of the most popular shows on TV, "Modern Family." Just this past week one of the local TV stations did a segment on the heavy dependence of electronic devices in our lives.

    It's not good. Whether it's the TV competing for family time at meals or a driver who can't operate a vehicle without speaking to someone on a cell phone, we, as a nation have a problem with too much dependence on this type of stimulation.

    I talk about this fact to my adult children every day and they are starting to understand the electronic impact and how it relates to their lives. No, none us want to live without these devices but surely we can control how much we allow them to infilitrate our everyday lives.

    It's obvious that there are probably more people on stress relieving medications than at any point in history. We must ask ourselves why.

    I would like to see the statistics from decade to decade over the course of the past 50 years to note the escalation of stress related medications. I have to imagine it must be significant.

    It was recently in the news that 90% of all Dr. appointments are for stress related issues. That's astounding!

    My hope is that people in general will realize that they need to slow down. Reading a great book is an excellent way to relax. We cannot control the fast paced world we live in but we can control the way we choose to live our lives privately and in our own home.

    I'm reminding my own adult children to take the time to relax and reconnect with nature when stuck in traffic or while out on a walk or jog without the use of electronics.

    Many people don't know it's OK to turn off TV while you perform simple housework or cook a meal.

    I enjoy TV. I love to write on my computer and I love my Nano but I don't have to enjoy these devices every minute of the day.

    I'm afraid so many people have forgotten how to simply relax and curl up with a great book.

    Maybe we just need to be reminded…

  • Susan Bourgeois

    >I think there's a great need for the publishing world to be around in the future.

    It doesn't take much to realize that our present world is moving too fast. Take a short time out to ponder the following:

    Children and adults are dependent on numerous electronical devices throughout the day more than any point throughout history.

    This cannot be good for numerous reasons.

    We need to revert to simple times in life and the sooner we figure it out the better. What better way than choosing to read great books?

    There's simply too much electronic stimulation in our lives. There was a recent segment on this exact issue on one of the most popular shows on TV, "Modern Family." Just this past week one of the local TV stations did a segment on the heavy dependence of electronic devices in our lives.

    It's not good. Whether it's the TV competing for family time at meals or a driver who can't operate a vehicle without speaking to someone on a cell phone, we, as a nation have a problem with too much dependence on this type of stimulation.

    I talk about this fact to my adult children every day and they are starting to understand the electronic impact and how it relates to their lives. No, none us want to live without these devices but surely we can control how much we allow them to infilitrate our everyday lives.

    It's obvious that there are probably more people on stress relieving medications than at any point in history. We must ask ourselves why.

    I would like to see the statistics from decade to decade over the course of the past 50 years to note the escalation of stress related medications. I have to imagine it must be significant.

    It was recently in the news that 90% of all Dr. appointments are for stress related issues. That's astounding!

    My hope is that people in general will realize that they need to slow down. Reading a great book is an excellent way to relax. We cannot control the fast paced world we live in but we can control the way we choose to live our lives privately and in our own home.

    I'm reminding my own adult children to take the time to relax and reconnect with nature when stuck in traffic or while out on a walk or jog without the use of electronics.

    Many people don't know it's OK to turn off TV while you perform simple housework or cook a meal.

    I enjoy TV. I love to write on my computer and I love my Nano but I don't have to enjoy these devices every minute of the day.

    I'm afraid so many people have forgotten how to simply relax and curl up with a great book.

    Maybe we just need to be reminded…

  • Susan Bourgeois

    >I have to apologize. I don't know why my post printed twice. It does that every now and then. Sorry.

  • T. Anne

    >I’m always excited when I see people reading in public places, enjoying paperbacks or e-readers. This is definitely an era of literary restructuring in regards to e-publishing. It seems as each year passes there is some startling advance in the publishing arena. It feels like a great time to be both a reader and a writer.

    I look forward to forging new bonds, signing a contract, getting my work into the hands of publishers, and seeing my dream come to fruition in the form a tangible novel. My hope is that I will see these things happened within the next several years.

  • Abigail

    >1. God (the Ultimate Author)
    2. Mr Amazing Dude (my hubby)
    3. Friends who are Readers
    4. My Cat :-) (She winks with wisdom and says, "I love you even if your stories never see the top of a publisher's desk." so interprets Mr Amazing Dude.)

  • David A. Todd

    >What gives me hope about the publishing industry is that, while it is changing and changing fast, the changes provide more avenues for publishing. Maybe print opportunities (which I really, really want to break into) are shrinking, but electronic opportunities are growing, including paying e-opportunities. I have an on-line writing gig that pays $100 for 400-600 word construction news articles and $250 for 800-1100 word features. That doesn't compare to print, but it's not bad money for Internet writing. It's paid quite a few bills over the summer, and the assignments are still coming in.

  • Katie Ganshert

    >I'll just second everything Rosslyn said.

  • Michael K. Reynolds

    >Creativity is the impervious shield for any Barbarians of change on the horizon. We shouldn't fear technology, because it will never blunt the power and purpose of content. Ours is the truest of evergreen industries.

  • Anonymous

    >Small publishers, ebooks, being able to by pass mainstream Houses and publish self via Amazon and other avenues…all good things for new writers trying to break in and not having to deal with the 'what have you done for us lately' mentality.

  • Michelle DeRusha

    >I give me hope. Nerdy people like me…people who love to read more than nearly anything else. And there are others like me! My son, 9, loves to read. Maybe he'll be doing his reading on an electronic device (I shudder a bit at that, as I am an old-fashioned book lover), but he'll be reading. The word will not die.

  • Ian O’Neill

    >What gives me hope about the future of publishing? That there's room for everyone.

  • Chad Thomas Johnston

    >Hello Rachelle:

    I have been following you on Twitter as an aspiring author for some time now, and I have been waiting for an excuse to post on your blog. I guess the time has arrived! ("Yay?" You say to yourself.)

    Consider me a student in your publishing industry classroom. This post is me hoisting my hand up high and saying, "Ooh, Rachelle! Pick me! OOH! I have something to say! Lookit!" My wife says "lookit." She is from Wisconsin. I think it's endearing. Don't you?

    That being said, when I think of the publishing industry's future, I cannot help but think of two cultural revolutions. First, people said the "talkies" would kill the movies back in 1927. But the talkies only silenced the silent pictures. The talking motion picture has yet to shut-up!

    Second, and more recently, I think of the changes that have occurred in the music industry in the past 10 years. The MP3 has killed the CD. The CD is D.O.A., R.I.P. The major record labels, which once had so much clout, are continually hemorrhaging money as a result of illegal file-sharing. Home recording studios have leveled the playing field, allowing Jon Bon Jovi and Jon who-lives-across-the-street-and-has-a-much-less-exotic-sounding-last-name alike to record and release music to the public. The industry is a different creature than it was 10 years ago. It has molted and shed skins and become an altogether different bird.

    But as a music consumer, I love these changes. Like Daniel Plainview in Paul Thomas Anderson's "There Will Be Blood," I drink the music industry's milkshake. Yes, you read that right. Their pain is my gain. But my gain has become their gain as well. It's been a circular progression. I buy far more music now than I did 10 years ago even if I do not pay as much for it. I also buy records I never would have bought before simply because they are affordable to me now. Even in a time of economic decline, my meager greenbacks are enough to pay the digital piper for his iTunes. Finally, because anyone can record and release music, whole worlds have been opened to me that I never would have seen or heard before. In the end, the music industry has changed, but it has become something infinitely more interesting if you ask me. It has suffered along the way, but it has transformed into an even more splendorous creature in the process.

    I say all of this for one reason: If the music industry has undergone such a magical transformation and lived to tell the tale, why should the publishing industry expect to find a less exhilarating future awaiting it? I suspect that those who love books will not let the publishing industry go into the cold, dark night of extinction without the prospect of waking up the next morning to anything short of a literary revolution.

    The talkies didn't kill the movies. I own 500 movies, so don't tell me they're dead. The MP3 didn't kill music. Music is more alive than ever. Here's hoping the publishing world will be more alive than ever in the not-so-distant future…

    Most Sincerely,

    Chad Thomas Johnston
    Aspiring Author
    Ph.D. Dropout
    Sonuva' Preacha' Man

  • wonderer

    >I ride the subway to work, and when I look around, I see lots of people reading. Mostly books. Mostly on paper.

    I'm doing National Novel Writing Month. So many of the people on the forums are voracious readers. There are over a hundred thousand participants. That's a lot of readers, many of them the teenagers who aren't "supposed" to be reading these days.

    My local indie genre (SF/F) bookstore is moving to a bigger space.

    Of course, none of the above is scientific, but it gives me hope anyway.

    Also, seconding what other commenters said about (a) the rise of e-publishing and (b) the continued existence of the music industry.

  • Jen

    >My sons' elementary school is having a fundraiser at Barnes and Noble this weekend. Seeing the kids there last night, excited about the books they were picking out, gives me such hope. Paper isn't going anywhere, as digital as our society has become. There is just something about the heft and the smell and the experience of a new book.

  • Danielle La Paglia

    >There are always the pessimists and doomsdayers. Everyone moaned that personal relationships were dead because we could do everything with the click of a button from our home computers. Yes I have online friends, but nothing beats gathering around a table with friends and sharing a true meal and real conversation.

    The same is true for publishing. E-books will make up a HUGE portion of the market from here on out, but book stores are not any more dead than video stores are.

    There's still something special about holding a book in your hand and that will never go away.

  • Mary Vensel White

    >I'm in the optimistic crowd. There are so many more options available to writers who want to achieve the simple end goal of getting their work read. I don't believe that the publishing world has been the arbiter of merit for some time; therefore, I can't think that e-publishing, self-publishing, etc. will clog up the channels with mediocrity as some suggest. I tend to think that more untraditional narratives will be told, those that perhaps don't fit neatly into genre or marketing plan. Sure, there's a lot out there but choice is good! Talent, along with hard work, will always rise to the top. That I believe.

  • Anna L. Walls

    >I am simplistically optimistic. There is little I can do to alter the distant future. All I can do is make sure I'm doing the best I can do at what I'm doing right now. For me, the sun will rise tomorrow; that is enough. And tomorrow, I will still do the best I can do at what I'm doing.

  • Neil Larkins

    >Five years ago my daughter was a well paid proofreader for a publisher and was laid off. Nine months ago they hired her back, albeit as a full-time temp making less money at the same job. She's been given the option of becoming permanent in six months at close to her old pay, so it looks like a postitive good sign.

  • Anonymous

    >Just FYI:

    That Russian post is a spammer trying to get you to go to a sex site. Don't follow its links.

  • Rick Barry

    >The power of story is undying. Whether in a book, or a sermon, or in casual conversation, when a good story starts, people perk up and pay attention. The storytellers are a necessary part of society.

  • Chad Thomas Johnston

    >Crap! I was hoping the Russian post was insider info from the Russian publishing world! Like a spy revealing cold war publishing secrets in the post-cold war era. Ha! :)

    - Chad Thomas Johnston

  • Buffy Andrews

    >I have lots of hope. In fact, it's an exciting time right now. As an industry, we are exploring new technologies and creative ways to share our work. There will always be a need for writers, but the way we present our writing might change. And I'm cool with that. While I might prefer sitting down with a book and opening it to read, I understand that my neighbor might prefer his on an e-reader. If we are to survive, and indeed thrive, as an industry, we must, must, must give our readers what they want in the way they want to receive it. If we don't, if we fail to reinvent ourselves to meet the changing times, we will die. So, yeah, I have lots of hope. I say bring it on and lets figure this out together. I believe in working multiple platforms to deliver our work to our audience not in the way WE THINK they should receive it, but in the way THEY WANT to receive it.

  • Bri Clark

    >I can sum up what gives me hope about the future of publishing with two words. Aaron Patterson.
    http://theworstbookever.blogspot.com/2010/11/chapter-eleven-stop-it.html

    He is passionate and his track record speaks for itself. I think he is one of those shrewd men who figured it out at just the right time.

  • Heather

    >Every time a friend of mine aquires an agent or sells their book it gives me hope. And it seems to be happening more and more lately. Publishing may be changing but I firmly believe people will always want stories. It is ingrained in our very nature.

  • Tahlia

    >Like many others I'm excited about the future of publishing. I can see that it's not so great for the big publishing houses, the internet offers so much for the smaller publishing houses and self published authors to get their books to their target audience the world over.

    Already I have found many great books that the big publishers wouldn't touch because they're different, but isn't it great that I can find such books now?

    I have bought more books in the 3 months since I got my ereader than I have in the last 3 years. They're cheaper. I figure that if everyone with an ereader does that, then things are looking good.

  • Anonymous

    >Мне кажется ништяк!

  • Anonymous

    >Если ты реально писал это для новичков, то стоило расписать более подробно…

  • http://barneys-printing.hubpages.com/hub/Printing-Services-Money-Spinning-Source-of-Professional-Achievement printing

    Thank you for the post

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